ARS § 13-1203: Arizona’s Assault Law

How Assault Is Defined in Arizona

Arizona’s assault law can be found in the Arizona Revised Statutes 13-1203.

The statute reads,

A. A person commits assault by: 1. Intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing any physical injury to another person; or 2. Intentionally placing another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent physical injury; or 3. Knowingly touching another person with the intent to injure, insult or provoke such person. B. Assault committed intentionally or knowingly pursuant to subsection A, paragraph 1 is a class 1 misdemeanor. Assault committed recklessly pursuant to subsection A, paragraph 1 or assault pursuant to subsection A, paragraph 2 is a class 2 misdemeanor. Assault committed pursuant to subsection A, paragraph 3 is a class 3 misdemeanor.

Intentionally, Knowingly, or Recklessly Causing Physical Injury

One of the ways an individual can be arrested for assault in violation of ARS 13-1203 is if there is evidence enough to substantiate that an individual intended on causing physical injury to another, knew what they were doing when they caused physical injury to another, or caused physical injury to another out of reckless actions.

Intentionally Placing Another At Risk of Physical Injury

The second way an individual could be accused of assault is if there is enough evidence to substantial that the individual intentionally placed another person in a situation that would reasonably cause physical injury. ARS 13-1203(2) places the qualifier “imminent” before “physical injury” to describe that physical injury does not necessarily have to occur, just that it likely would have occurred given the situation the alleged victim was placed in.

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Knowingly Touching with Intent to Injure, Insult, or Provoke

The “touching” described here does not require excessive force or violence. Subsection 3 in this statute simply describes a type of touching that attempts to injure the recipient, insult them, or provoke them to anger or further action.

For further clarification, let’s break down some definitions:

  • Intentionally: Regarding conduct, “intentionally” refers to an individual’s objective, which in this case would be to cause that result or to engage in that conduct described in the statute.
  • Knowingly: Regarding conduct described in a statute, “knowingly” refers to an awareness or belief that such conduct is of that nature or that the circumstance exists. Ignorance is no justification here, as “knowingly” does not require the individual to know the act or omission is unlawful.
  • Recklessly: Awareness of an act or omission, yet consciously disregarding the risk that would occur as a result.
  • Physical Injury: Any sort of impairment to a person’s physical condition.

For more definitions, visit ARS 13-105. If you or someone you love was arrested on assault charges in Arizona, contact the Phoenix criminal defense attorneys at MayesTelles PLLC today for a free consultation. We are available 24/7.

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